Archive for the ‘Wisdom’ Category

Dealing with grief: https://www.neptunesociety.com/resources/the-guide-to-pet-bereavement-what-to-expect-after-the-loss-of-a-loved-one & more

As many years as I’ve been in the health field, it’s never been easy to lose someone, whether personally or professionally. Although it’s something many people avoid talking about, death & the grief that follows it are unavoidable.

I was reminded of this recently after losing a lifelong friend who lost her battle with cancer. We knew some months ago that we would lose her… but it didn’t make it any easier. My grief is something I’m still dealing with (& know I will continue to deal with). I’ve been doing a lot of research for Public Health Corps on this topic lately in an effort to help any of our readers who may be going through a similar difficult time, & I thought I would share some of my findings with you, as well.

Laid to Rest at Home: How to Plan a Home Memorial Service for Your Departed Loved One
https://www.redfin.com/blog/how-to-memorial-service-at-home

The New Stages of Grief: 5 Tasks, No Timeline  https://www.caring.com/articles/five-stages-of-grief

Final Logistics: A Step-by-Step Guide to Handling a Loved One’s Belongings After Their Death:  https://www.closetbox.com/resources/final-logistics-step-step-guide-handling-loved-ones-belongings-death/

Supporting a Child When Someone Dies:  https://www.mariecurie.org.uk/help/bereaved-family-friends/supporting-grieving-child

Coping with a Child’s Illness While You’re in Recovery: Learn Coping Methods While Going Through this Difficult Time:  www.drugrehab.org/coping-childs-illness-recovery/

Dementia Patients and Grief:  https://www.pathwayshealth.org/dementia-care/dementia-patients-and-grief/

The Guide to Pet Bereavement: What to Expect After the Loss of a Loved One:  https://www.neptunesociety.com/resources/the-guide-to-pet-bereavement-what-to-expect-after-the-loss-of-a-loved-one

When Grief Becomes a Mental Health Issue:  www.healthyplace.com/blogs/recoveringfrommentalillness/2016/03/when-bereavement-becomes-a-mental-health-issue/

publichealthcorps.org   340 S Lemon Ave #5780 | Walnut, CA 91789

Death is nothing at All by Henry Scott-Holland: https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/death-is-nothing-at-all-by-henry-scott-holland

through Sherril.Skibell@TTU.edu at Dr. Margaret “Peggy” Sheffield Lutherer’s memorial service & read by Alice at memorial service of Dr. John Aure Buesseler at the 46-yr.-old CEO Roundtable:  This poem is often read at funerals. The author, Henry Scott-Holland (1847-1918), a priest at St. Paul’s Cathedral of London, did not intend it as a poem, it was actually delivered as part of a sermon in 1910. The sermon, titled, “Death, the King of Terrors” was preached while the body of King Edward VII was lying in state at Westminster.  READ  COMPLETE STORY  PRINT

Death Is Nothing At All by Henry Scott-Holland More Henry Scott-Holland  

https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/death-is-nothing-at-all-by-henry-scott-holland

Death is nothing at all.
It does not count.
I have only slipped away into the next room.
Nothing has happened.

Everything remains exactly as it was.
I am I, and you are you,
and the old life that we lived so fondly together is untouched, unchanged.
Whatever we were to each other, that we are still.

Call me by the old familiar name.
Speak of me in the easy way which you always used.
Put no difference into your tone.
Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow.

Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes that we enjoyed together.
Play, smile, think of me, pray for me.
Let my name be ever the household word that it always was.
Let it be spoken without an effort, without the ghost of a shadow upon it.

Life means all that it ever meant.
It is the same as it ever was.
There is absolute and unbroken continuity.
What is this death but a negligible accident?

Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight?
I am but waiting for you, for an interval,
somewhere very near,
just round the corner.

All is well.
Nothing is hurt; nothing is lost.
One brief moment and all will be as it was before.
How we shall laugh at the trouble of parting when we meet again!

LifeStories Alive: MOKrent@LifeStoriesAlive.com

You are invited to FBG Morning Rotary’s breakfast on Thur., June 22, 6:45a at The Buffalo Nickel Bar & Grill at 105 S. Llano St. in downtown Fredericksburg – in case our  “LifeStories Alive” speaker* might be of special interest to you & your family.

* Mike O’Krent –  the founder of LifeStories Alive, LLC, specializes in the making personal history videos for families.  MOKrent@LifeStoriesAlive.com

Born and raised in San Antonio, TX, Mike received his degree in Marketing and Management from Southern Methodist University.

In a life-changing experience, from 1996 through 2000, Mike interviewed Holocaust survivors for Steven Spielberg’s Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Foundation, now the USC Shoah Foundation. It was through that experience he discovered the significance and technique of recording the life stories of loved ones. That formed the basis for his LifeStories business.

 

Since founding the business in 2006, LifeStories Alive has filmed legacy videos for hundreds of client families and non-profit organizations.

Mike currently serves as a Trustee for Austin’s ZACH Theatre. He has served as the Chairman of the Yom HaShoah (Day of Holocaust Remembrance) Committee for the Jewish Community Association of Austin from 2009 to the present.

How much good there is in the world!

It is so many years since 9/11/2001,  but here is a wonderful story about that terrible day.

Jerry Brown, Delta Flight 15…(true story) from a flight attendant on Delta Flight 15, written following 9-11-’01:

On the morning of Tuesday, September 11, we were about 5 hours out of Frankfurt, flying over the North Atlantic .

All of a sudden the curtains parted and I was told to go to the cockpit, immediately, to see the captain. As soon as I got there I noticed that the crew had that “All Business” look on their faces. The captain handed me a printed message. It was from Delta’s main office in Atlanta and simply read, “All airways over the Continental United States are closed to commercial air traffic. Land ASAP at the nearest airport. Advise your destination.”

No one said a word about what this could mean. We knew it was a serious situation and we needed to find terrafirma quickly. The captain determined that the nearest airport was 400 miles behind us in Gander , New Foundland.

He requested approval for a route change from the Canadian traffic controller and approval was granted immediately — no questions asked. We found out later, of course, why there was no hesitation in approving our request.

While the flight crew prepared the airplane for landing, another message arrived from Atlanta telling us about some terrorist activity in the New York area. A few minutes later word came in about the hijackings.

We decided to lie to the passengers while we were still in the air. We told them the plane had a simple instrument problem and that we needed to land at the nearest airport in Gander , New Foundland, to have it checked out.

We promised to give more information after landing in Gander . There was much grumbling among the passengers, but that’s nothing new. Forty minutes later, we landed in Gander … Local time at Gander was 12:30 PM … that’s 11:00 AM EST

There were already about 20 other airplanes on the ground from all over the world that had taken this detour on their way to the U.S.

After we parked on the ramp, the captain made the following announcement: “Ladies and gentlemen, you must be wondering if all these airplanes around us have the same instrument problem as we have. The reality is that we are here for another reason.” Then he went on to explain the little bit we knew about the situation in the U.S. There were loud gasps and stares of disbelief. The captain informed passengers that Ground control in Gander told us to stay put.

The Canadian Government was in charge of our situation and no one was allowed to get off the aircraft. No one on the ground was allowed to come near any of the aircrafts. Only airport police would come around periodically, look us over and go on to the next airplane. In the next hour or so more planes landed and Gander ended up with 53 airplanes from all over the world, 27 of which were U.S. commercial jets.

Meanwhile, bits of news started to come in over the aircraft radio and for the first time we learned that airplanes were flown into the World Trade Centre in New York and into the Pentagon in DC. People were trying to use their cell phones, but were unable to connect due to a different cell system in Canada . Some did get through, but were only able to get to the Canadian operator who would tell them that the lines to the U.S. were either blocked or jammed.

Sometime in the evening the news filtered to us that the twin towers buildings had collapsed and that a fourth hijacking had resulted in a crash. By now the passengers were emotionally and physically exhausted, not to mention frightened, but everyone stayed amazingly calm. We had only to look out the window at the 52 other stranded aircraft to realize that we were not the only ones in this predicament.

We had been told earlier that they would be allowing people off the planes one plane at a time. At 6 PM, Gander airport told us that our turn to deplane would be 11 am the next morning. Passengers were not happy, but they simply resigned themselves to this news without much noise and started to prepare themselves to spend the night on the airplane.

Gander had promised us medical attention, if needed, water, and lavatory servicing. And they were true to their word. Fortunately we had no medical situations to worry about. We did have a young lady who was 33 weeks into her pregnancy. We took REALLY good care of her. The night passed without incident despite the uncomfortable sleeping arrangements.

About 10:30 on the morning of the 12th a convoy of school buses showed up. We got off the plane and were taken to the terminal where we went through Immigration and Customs and then had to register with the Red Cross.

After that we (the crew) were separated from the passengers and were taken in vans to a small hotel. We had no idea where our passengers were going. We learned from the Red Cross that the town of Gander has a population of10,400 people and they had about 10,500 passengers to take care of from all the airplanes that were forced into Gander !

We were told to just relax at the hotel and we would be contacted when the U.S. airports opened again, but not to expect that call for a while.

We found out the total scope of the terror back home only after getting to our hotel and turning on the TV, 24 hours after it all started.

Meanwhile, we had lots of time on our hands and found that the people of Gander were extremely friendly. They started calling us the “plane people”. We enjoyed their hospitality, explored the town of Gander and ended up having a pretty good time.

Two days later, we got that call and were taken back to the Gander airport. Back on the plane, we were reunited with the passengers and found out what they had been doing for the past two days. What we found out was incredible.

Gander and all the surrounding communities (within about a 75 Kilometer radius) had closed all high schools, meeting halls, lodges, and any other large gathering places. They converted all these facilities to mass lodging areas for all the stranded travellers. Some had cots set up, some had mats with sleeping bags and pillows set up.

ALL the high school students were required to volunteer their time to take care of the “guests”. Our 218 passengers ended up in a town called Lewisporte, about 45 kilometers from Gander where they were put up in a high school. If any women wanted to be in a women-only facility, that was arranged. Families were kept together. All the elderly passengers were taken to private homes.

Remember that young pregnant lady? She was put up in a private home right across the street from a 24-hour Urgent Care facility. There was a dentist on call and both male and female nurses remained with the crowd for the duration.

Phone calls and e-mails to the U.S. and around the world were available to everyone once a day. During the day, passengers were offered “Excursion” trips. Some people went on boat cruises of the lakes and harbors. Some went for hikes in the local forests. Local bakeries stayed open to make fresh bread for the guests.

Food was prepared by all the residents and brought to the schools. People were driven to restaurants of their choice and offered wonderful meals. Everyone was given tokens for local laundramats to wash their clothes, since luggage was still on the aircraft. In other words, every single need was met for those stranded travellers.

Passengers were crying while telling us these stories. Finally, when they were told that U.S. airports had reopened, they were delivered to the airport right on time and without a single passenger missing or late. The local Red Cross had all the information about the whereabouts of each and every passenger and knew which plane they needed to be on and when all the planes were leaving. They coordinated everything beautifully.

It was absolutely incredible.

When passengers came on board, it was like they had been on a cruise. Everyone knew each other by name. They were swapping stories of their stay, impressing each other with who had the better time. Our flight back to Atlanta looked like a chartered party flight. The crew just stayed out of their way. It was mind-boggling.

Passengers had totally bonded and were calling each other by their first names, exchanging phone numbers, addresses, and email addresses.

And then a very unusual thing happened.

One of our passengers approached me and asked if he could make an announcement over the PA system. We never, ever, allow that. But this time was different. I said “of course” and handed him the mike. He picked up the PA and reminded everyone about what they had just gone through in the last few days. He reminded them of the hospitality they had received at the hands of total strangers. He continued by saying that he would like to do something in return for the good folks of Lewisporte

“He said he was going to set up a Trust Fund under the name of DELTA 15 (our flight number). The purpose of the trust fund is to provide college scholarships for the high school students of Lewisporte. He asked for donations of any amount from his fellow travelers. When the paper with donations got back to us with the amounts, names, phone numbers, and addresses, the total was for more than $14,000!

“The gentleman, a MD from Virginia , promised to match the donations and to start the administrative work on the scholarship. He also said that he would forward this proposal to Delta Corporate and ask them to donate as well.

As I write this account, the trust fund is at more than $1.5 million and has assisted 134 students in college education.

“I just wanted to share this story because we need good stories right now. It gives me a little bit of hope to know that some people in a faraway place were kind to some strangers who literally dropped in on them.

It reminds me how much good there is in the world

“In spite of all the rotten things we see going on in today’s world this story confirms that there are still a lot of good people in the world and when things get bad, they will come forward.”

This is one of those stories that need to be shared. Please do so.

Wichita (KS) Community Foundation

Wichita (KS) Community Foundation:  www.WichitaCF.org & James Woods, Director of Donor Services, 316-264-4880, JWoods@WichitaCF.org

AVW template for top line of e-messages

AVW template for top line of e-messages:  [Sent “bcc” – to avoid scrolling through e-addresses.  I apologize for duplicates due to your various leadership roles.  Please apply for funding &/or e-forward to other individuals, lifelong students, organizations; public health, community & faith-based organizations; colleges’ & universities’ financial-aid, departmental-level offices, faculty / staff senate, student organizations, study-abroad offices, etc.  Thank you.  To unsubscribe, please e-Reply & include “unsubscribe” & include these numbers: 121-140.  The numbers help me locate & delete your e-address from among the 20,000+ e-addresses on my hundreds of e-lists  Thank you & best wishes always in the fulfillment of your life goals.]always in the fulfillment of your life goals.]

Progressive policies for animal welfare

Facebook:  look at PGFerals.  Prince Georges Feral Friends, SPCA is advocating for progressive policies.

Also, http://www.NoKillPrinceGeorgesCountyMD.org

Pets’ identification through microchipping:  www.AvidID.com

Join me in $upporting the Talladega College Marching Band fund: https://www.gofundme.com/great-tornado-to-inaugural-parade

Please join me in $upporting the Talladega College Marching Band fund:  https://www.gofundme.com/great-tornado-to-inaugural-parade &/or e-forward to others who may want to $upport the marching band.  Thank you.      Friends,  Alice

From: Isabel Werts [mailto:iwerts@austin.rr.com] Sent: Thursday, January 12, 2017 7:02 AM  To: iwerts@austin.rr.com  Subject: Support the Talladega College Marching Band fund     In 8 days $47,000 of the $75,000 goal has been donated by 1,000 households. Please forward this to your contacts .   No matter whom you supported for president,  I hope you will see this as support for the members of the band and not a political statement.  What a wonderful memory to share with their children.     Talladega is a historically black college, and it was invited by the Inaugural Committee to participate in the upcoming Inaugural Parade. Should they do so? College President Billy Hawkins doesn’t even think it’s a difficult question.     “The inauguration of a new president is not a political event, but a civil ceremony celebrating the transfer of power,” Hawkins said.     So yes. Hawkins has issued a statement saying the Talladega College marching band is marching in the inaugural parade!      Commendations to Talladega College and President Hawkins for separating politics from ceremony, and for not allowing illogical and irrational attitudes to stop a group of young people from a learning experience.     I have contributed to their GoFundMe page to cover expenses for the trip. I hope you’ll join me and do the same. They deserve our support.

Luzaan’s prayer at FBG Morning Rotary

Almighty & Everlasting God, we stand in y9ur Holy presence.  We humbly ask You to bless & inspire us so that everything that we Think Say or Do will be in accordance with Your will.

Enlighten our minds, strengthen our spirits & fill our hearts with Love, Wisdom & Understanding so that we can be an effective channel of Truth, Love & Compassion.

May the spirit of Harmony, Peace & Mutual Respect prevail over this gathering so that we can move forward in serving others.

Oh, God, we Pray.       Amen

Dealing with death

 

 

Helping Your Child Deal With Death

 

Overcoming the Loss of a Child Without Drugs or Alcohol: A Parent’s Guide

 

How Grief Can Make You Sick

 

Advice for surviving the death of a spouse or partner at a young age

 

How to Help an Elderly Parent Deal With the Death of a Spouse

 

How to Avoid Family Conflicts after the Death of a Parent

 

Coping With the Death of Your Pet

Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution: Artificial Intelligence, the Exponential Age!

insights at the beginning of 2017:  Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution:  Artificial Intelligence, the Exponential Age!  Interesting predictions … the past & the future.

a meaningful review:  In 1998, Kodak had 170,000 employees & sold 85% of all photo paper worldwide.   Within just a few years, their business model disappeared, & they went bankrupt.      

What happened to Kodak will happen in a lot of industries in the next 10 years.  Most people won’t see it coming. 
Did you think in 
1998 that 3 years later you would never take pictures on film again?  Yet digital cameras were invented in 1975.  The first ones only had 10,000 pixels, but followed Moore ‘s law:  a disappointment for a time, before it became way superior & became mainstream in only a few short years. 

It will now happen again with Artificial Intelligence, health, autonomous & electric cars, education, 3-dimensional printing, agriculture & jobs. 

Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution.  Welcome to the Exponential Age . 

Software will disrupt most traditional industries in the next 5-10 years.

Uber is just a software tool, they don’t own any cars & are now the biggest taxi company in the world.

AirBnB is now the biggest hotel company in the world, although they don’t own any properties.

Artificial  Intelligence:  Computers become exponentially better in understanding the world. This year, a computer beat the best Go-player in the world, 10 years earlier than expected.

In the US, young  lawyers already don’t get jobs.   Because of IBM’s Watson, you can get legal advice (so far, for more or less basic stuff) within seconds, with 90% accuracy compared with 70% accuracy when done by humans.

So if you study law, stop immediately.  There will be 90% fewer lawyers in the future, only specialists will remain.

IBM’s Watson already helps nurses diagnosing cancer, it’s 4 times more accurate than human nurses.

Facebook now has a pattern recognition software that can recognize faces better than humans.  In 2030, computers will become more intelligent than humans.

Autonomous cars: In  2018 the first self-driving cars will appear for the public. Around 2020, the complete industry will start to be disrupted. You don’t want to own a car anymore.  You will call a car with your phone, & it will show up at your location & drive you to your destination. You will not need to park it, you only pay for the driven distance & can be productive while riding.

Our kids will never get a driver’s licence & will never own a car.

It will change the cities, because we will need 90-95% fewer cars for that.  We can transform former parking spaces into parks.

1.2 million people die each year in car accidents worldwide.  We now have one accident every 60,000 miles (100,000 km), with autonomous driving that will drop to 1 accident in 6 million miles (10 million km). That will save a million lives each year.

Most car companies will probably become bankrupt.  Traditional car companies try the evolutionary approach & just build a better car, while tech companies (Tesla, Apple, Google) will do the revolutionary approach & build a computer on wheels.

Many engineers from Volkswagen & Audi are completely terrified of Tesla.

Insurance companies will have massive trouble because without accidents, the insurance will become 100x cheaper.   Their car-insurance business model will disappear.

Real estate will change.  Because if you can work while you commute, people will move further away to live in a more beautiful neighborhood.

Electric cars will become mainstream about 2020.  Cities will be less noisy because all new cars will run on electricity.

Electricity will become incredibly cheap & clean:  Solar production has been on an exponential curve for 30 years, but you can now see the burgeoning impact.

Last year, more solar energy was installed worldwide than fossil.  Energy companies are desperately trying to limit access to the grid to prevent competition from home solar installations, but that can’t last. Technology will take care of that strategy.

With cheap electricity comes cheap & abundant water.  Desalination of salt water now only needs 2kWh per cubic meter (@$.025). We don’t have scarce water in most places, we only have scarce drinking water.  Imagine what will be possible if anyone can have as much clean water as s/he wants, for nearly no cost.

Health: The Tricorder X price will be announced this year.  There are companies who will build a medical device (called the “Tricorder” from Star Trek) that works with your phone, which takes your retina scan, your blood sample & you breath into it.

It then analyses 54 bio-markers that will identify nearly any disease.  It will be cheap, so in a few years everyone on this planet will have access to world-class medical analysis, nearly for free — Good by, medical establishment.

3-dimensional printing: The price of the cheapest 3-D printer came down from $18,000 to $400 within 10 years. In the same time, it  became 100 times faster.  All major shoe companies have already started 3D printing shoes

Some spare airplane parts are already 3-D printed in remote airports.  The space station now has a printer that eliminates the need for the large amount of spare parts they used to have in the past.

At the end of this year, new smart phones will have 3-D scanning possibilities.  You can then 3-D scan your feet & print your perfect shoe at home.

In China , they already 3-D printed & built a complete 6-story office building.  By 2027, 10% of everything that’s being  produced will be 3-D printed.

Business opportunities: If you think of a niche you want to go in, first ask yourself: “In the future, do I think we will have that?” & if the answer is “Yes,” then how can you make that happen sooner?

If it doesn’t work with your phone, forget the idea.  And any idea designed for success in the 20th century is doomed to failure in the 21st century.

Work : 70-80% of jobs will disappear in the next 20 years. There will be a lot of new jobs, but it is not clear if there will be enough new jobs in such a short time.  This will require a re-think on wealth distribution.              

Agriculture: There will be a $100 agricultural robot in the future.  Farmers in 3rd world countries can then become managers of their field instead of working all day on their fields.

Aeroponics will need much less water. The first Petri dish produced veal, is now available & will be cheaper than cow produced veal in 2018. Right now, 30% of all agricultural surfaces is used for cows.  Imagine if we don’t need that space anymore.

There are several start-ups that will bring insect protein to the market shortly.  It contains more protein than meat. It will be labelled as “alternative protein source”  (because most people still reject the idea of eating insects).

There is a computer application / app called “moodies” which can already tell in which mood youre in.  By 2020 there will be apps that can tell by your facial expressions whether you are lying.  Imagine a political debate where it’s being displayed when theyre telling the truth & when theyre not.

Thoughts about those of us blessed with many decades

A beautiful young person is a Coincidence of Nature.     A beautiful old person is a Work of Art.     attributed to William Shakespeare 

One’s Inner Self designs & illuminates one’s True Beauty.       anonymous 

Young People think fast.  Old People think deep.       an African saying

And a joke to end 2016 and start 2017:

An old doctor became very bored in retirement & decided to open a medical clinic.

He put a sign up outside that said:

“Dr Geezer’s Clinic.  Get your treatment for $500.  If not cured, get back $1,000.”

Doctor “Young,” who was positive that this old geezer didn’t know beans about medicine, thought this would be a great opportunity to get $1,000 so he went to Dr Geezer’s clinic.

Dr Young: “Dr.Geezer, I have lost all taste in my mouth.  Can you please help me?”

Dr. Geezer: “Nurse, please bring medicine from box 22 & put 3 drops in Dr Young’s mouth.”

Dr. Young: Aaagh!! — “This is Gasoline!”

Dr. Geezer: “Congratulations!  You’ve got your taste back.  That will be $500.”

Dr Young gets annoyed & goes back after a couple of days figuring to recover his money.

Dr Young:  “I have lost my memory, I cannot remember anything.”

Dr Geezer: “Nurse, please bring medicine from box 22 & put 3 drops in the patient’s mouth.”

Dr Young:  “Oh, no you don’t,  — that is Gasoline!”

Dr Geezer: “Congratulations!  You’ve got your memory back.  That will be $500.”

Dr. Young (after having lost $1000) leaves angrily & comes back after several more days.

Dr.Young: “My eyesight has become weak — I can hardly see anything!!!!”

Dr. Geezer: “Well, I don’t have any medicine for that so here’s your $1000 back.”  (giving him a $10 bill)

Dr. Young: “But this is only $10!”

Dr. Geezer:  “Congratulations! You got your vision back!  That will be $500.”

Moral of story  — Just because you’re “young” doesn’t mean that you can outsmart an “old Geezer”.

Remember: Don’t make old people mad.  We don’t like being old in the first place, so it doesn’t take much to tick us off.

Good news & hope for the future: http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/11/04/opinion/dalai-lama-behind-our-anxiety-the-fear-of-being-unneeded.html?_r=1&referer=

Good news & hope for the future:  http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/11/04/opinion/dalai-lama-behind-our-anxiety-the-fear-of-being-unneeded.html?_r=1&referer=

The Web link explains why I enjoy Rotary:  http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/11/04/opinion/dalai-lama-behind-our-anxiety-the-fear-of-being-unneeded.html?_r=1&referer=

Dalai Lama: Behind Our Anxiety, the Fear of Being Unneeded   By THE DALAI LAMA and ARTHUR C. BROOKS    November 4, 2016    In many ways, there has never been a better time to be alive. Violence plagues some corners of the world, and too many still live under the grip of tyrannical regimes. And although all the world’s major faiths teach love, compassion and tolerance, unthinkable violence is being perpetrated in the name of religion.

And yet, fewer among us are poor, fewer are hungry, fewer children are dying, and more men and women can read than ever before. In many countries, recognition of women’s and minority rights is now the norm. There is still much work to do, of course, but there is hope and there is progress.   How strange, then, to see such anger and great discontent in some of the world’s richest nations. In the United States, Britain and across the European Continent, people are convulsed with political frustration and anxiety about the future. Refugees and migrants clamor for the chance to live in these safe, prosperous countries, but those who already live in those promised lands report great uneasiness about their own futures that seems to border on hopelessness.

Why?   A small hint comes from interesting research about how people thrive. In one shocking experiment, researchers found that senior citizens who didn’t feel useful to others were nearly three times as likely to die prematurely as those who did feel useful. This speaks to a broader human truth: We all need to be needed.

Being “needed” does not entail selfish pride or unhealthy attachment to the worldly esteem of others. Rather, it consists of a natural human hunger to serve our fellow men and women. As the 13th-century Buddhist sages taught, “If one lights a fire for others, it will also brighten one’s own way.”

Virtually all the world’s major religions teach that diligent work in the service of others is our highest nature and thus lies at the center of a happy life. Scientific surveys and studies confirm shared tenets of our faiths. Americans who prioritize doing good for others are almost twice as likely to say they are very happy about their lives. In Germany, people who seek to serve society are five times likelier to say they are very happy than those who do not view service as important. Selflessness and joy are intertwined. The more we are one with the rest of humanity, the better we feel.

Keep your brain vibrant & clear: 3 all-natural, dementia-fighting habits & more!

3 all-natural, dementia-fighting habits:  [1] learn 1 new word a day in a foreign language; [2] play a musical instrument for 5 minutes a day; & [3] make 1 small change to your diet:  Unbreakable Brain:  Shield your brain from cognitive decline for life!  by Will Mitchell, DOM, LAs, MS Nutrition

Diet & vitamins can reverse symptoms of dementia:    avoid sugar; add MCTs (medium-chain triglycerides) = most potent coconut oil; fish oil; B2, B6 & B12 vitamins, chicken salad, eggs, argula; music, socializing regularly.  “CogniForce”

http://www.neurology.org/content/early/2013/11/06/01.wnl.0000436620.33155.a4.abstract?sid=f43530ca-573d-4d57-bd1c-b3dfb1282084 & www.hindawi.com/journals/ijad/2014/836748/ &  www.alz.org/10-signs-symptoms-alzheimers-dementia.asp & www.cbsnews.com/news/pat-summitts-death-what-to-know-about-early-onset-alzheimers/ & http://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/transcripts/1528_young-onset-dementias & https://www.alz.org/documents_custom/2016-facts-and-figures.pdf & https://www.alz.org/downloads/facts_figures_2012.pdf & www.wsj.com/articles/at-95-a-lifelong-skiier-says-the-source-of-his-vitality-is-his-workout-1448899633 & http://idrp.pbrc.edu/faq.htm & http://www.ocala.com/article/20130331/ARTICLES/130339991?p=1&tc=pg&tc=ar & www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_causes_risk_factors.asp & www.aspentimes.com/news/15936744-113/80-year-old-earns-aspens-100-day-skiing-pin & www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160616071933.htm & www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2014/06/02/318238155/91-year-old-woman-breaks-marathon-record      DISCLAIMER   This website is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice and treatment from your personal physician. Visitors are advised to consult their own doctors or other qualified health professional regarding the treatment of medical conditions. The author shall not be held liable or responsible for any misunderstanding or misuse of the information contained on this site or for any loss, damage, or injury caused, or alleged to be caused, directly or indirectly by any treatment, action, or application of any food or food source discussed in this website. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration have not evaluated the statements on this website. The information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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Dane are happiest & have best work-Life balance

Dane are happiest & have best work-Life balance:

Danes have the best work-life balance in the world thanks to these 3 important beliefs.