Healthy & safe! TX Tech Univ. campus cats

Shelley.Kemp@TTU.edu  2016-2017 STAFF ADVISOR TX Tech Feral Cat student organization  Sr. Editor – Curriculum Development  TTUISD   Drane Hall, Room 135   P.O. Box 42191    Lubbock, TX  79409-2191; 806.834.3716; www.ttuisd.ttu.edu

Organization monitors campus cat population By Jennifer Romero, Staff Writer Daily Toreador – Dept. of Student Media, Texas Tech University

Texas Tech has been the home to a population of feral cats for years, and a number of cats remain on campus this year.

Lydia Kong, a junior psychology major from Fort Worth and president of the Tech Feral Cat Coalition, said the organization aims to maintain the welfare of the cats on campus.

“We TNR, or trap-neuter-release, cats that are found on campus,” she said. “Many of the cats have been abandoned, and we try to re-home kittens or friendly cats that we find.”

This year, the organization is focusing on compiling more thorough database of the cats on campus, Kong said.

Students can report cats they see, she said.

The database will include a profile for each cat sighted, according to TechAnnounce, and a picture and other details about the cat are documented.

“We wanted to have a better database because we want to TNR the cats we do find,” Kong said. “It’s important for us to find the cats and neuter them before spring so we don’t have a massive cat population.”

The club is also planning to build winter shelters for the cats, she said, and the goal is to eliminate cats burrowing under buildings and causing problems on campus.

“Cats actually help maintain the public sanitary needs of the campus,” Kong said. “They keep the rodent populations low, and that limits the diseases those animals carry.”

More than 15 cats have been documented so far this semester in the database, she said.

Various students have contacted her to report cat sightings, she said.

The Feral Cat Coalition aims to address any type of cat problems, Kong said.

Students can contact the coalition with any issue or questions they have, she said.

“As long as Texas Tech exists and students come and people love animals, the cat population won’t be removed,” she said. “We just want to maintain the welfare of the cats we do have.”

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